Do You Have Your Puppy/Dog on an Appropriate Vaccine Schedule?

Hello Everyone! Those of you who know me, know that I have very strong opinions, especially when it comes to vaccines. My own dogs are NOT vaccinated every year, they instead have titer tests for IMMUNITY! I do think that all dogs, like children should have an annual checkup, not for vaccines, but to make sure nothing is brewing that could be a detriment to your dog’s health. Whole Dog Journal put out a really informative downloadable e-book that I think every dog parent should have! The information here is so important, and may go against what your vet recommends. When you are informed, you can make a better educated decision on the health care options of your fur kid. Below is the link.

As always, my goal is to help you keep your dog healthy and happy for as long as possible!!  Please leave a comment or contact me with questions or ideas.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Wishing you Health and Prosperity,

Margaret

https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/product/vaccinations/?MailingID=873&st=pmail&sc=EB20201120-Vaccinations&utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Know+Which+Shots+Your+Dog+Needs+-+and+Which+He+Doesn+t&utm_campaign=EB20201120-Vaccinations

Please avoid puppy mills.

Please be aware of where you get your puppy. Pet stores have puppies from puppy mills. This is a video of a dog rescued from a puppy mill. There are wonderful, responsible breeders, rescue organizations and shelters where wonderful dogs are waiting for loving forever homes. I hope this changes your mind about the cute puppies in the window.

Wishing you Health and Prospertiy!

Margaret

Critical periods in a puppy’s development.

Hello everyone! After a conversation with a woman whose puppy had a bad experience I thought it was important that you understand the critical periods in a dogs life, especially fear imprint periods, of which there are two. They may occur earlier or later, since each pup is an individual. Any fearful situation during these critical times can cause a fear that the dog never gets over. I found this article that explains the different periods in yours puppy’s growth and maturation process. Not all people working with animals are patient and willing to help a dog learn gently to tolerate necessary’s like the vet or grooming. Please be your pups parent and advocate, there is no reason why ANY dog should be afraid, bullied or traumatized by ANYONE! If you can’t observe how your dog is being treated, especially by someone you don’t know, do not leave them!!! I hope this article helps you make informed decisions in the care of your fur kid. Please let me know if there is anything I can help you with.

https://www.doglistener.co.uk/puppies/criticalperiods.shtml

Can DNA testing help you get a healthy puppy?

So, my son has a beautiful Siberian Husky he is considering breeding, the first thing he did was do a genetic DNA test. The results are really nice! I was curious, do breeders do DNA testing? If so, what are the benefits? If not, can this test help breeders produce puppies less likely to have health or temperament problems? I heard of a breeder in Pennsylvania, she does DNA testing, is very picky of who she breeds her dogs to, and guarantees the health of her puppies for 18 months!! I found this article by the AKC and thought it would be useful for anyone looking for a puppy. After learning this I would definitely want a puppy from dogs who both had a DNA test so I would have an idea of what to expect as far as health and temperament. There are also questions I would ask the breeder about the general health and temperament of her dogs and puppies. References of past puppy buyers and owners would also be something I would want. The breeder should be very careful of who buys his puppies, I would also be very careful of who I buy a puppy from. Hope you find this information useful!

What You Need to Know About Dog DNA Tests

By AKC StaffDec 21, 2015 | 4 Minutes

dog dna tests

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is composed of a sequence of substances known as nucleotides. It carries the unique blueprint for every individual living organism—from the smallest bacterium to humans. Genes are segments of DNA, and these code for specific proteins that play the central role in building, maintaining, and reproducing a cell.

Dogs have about 20,000 to 25,000 genes that are located along 78 chromosomes (compared to 46 in humans).

In 2005, an international research team led by MIT’s Broad Institute published a paper in the journal Nature, describing the sequencing the canine genome. This complete set of dog genes gave scientists, breeders, and owners a powerful tool to better understand and care for dogs.

The research was based on the genetic sequence of Tasha, a female Boxer. This breakthrough gave researchers a tool for identifying genes for specific traits, including diseases, in addition to pinpointing genes and parentage.

Courtesy National Human Genome Research Institute/Broad Institute

Today, DNA testing is used in the following ways:

  • Confirming parentage
    A technology known as “genetic fingerprinting” is used by law-enforcement throughout the world to positively identify crime suspects. The same technology can be used to provide a DNA snapshot of any individual, canine or human. These profiles serve several functions, including positive identification of a dog, accurate pedigree tracking, and confirmation of parentage. The American Kennel Club offers AKC DNA Profiles service that creates and records the genetic identification of dogs. This voluntary program adds value to breeding programs by giving breeders a way to eliminate concerns and questions about parentage. How does this work? Each gene is present as two copies called alleles. Offspring receive one copy of each gene from each parent. DNA tests to confirm parentage do not use actual genes, but other DNA sequences referred to as markers. These are not functional genes, so the DNA profiles are used only for genetic identity and parentage verification. They do not provide any information about appearance, genetic diseases, or breed.
  • Enforcing pet waste laws
    The same kind of technology is used to put the finger on poop-law scofflaws. One company—PooPrints by BioPet Laboratories, in Knoxville, Tennessee—has offered a genetic profiling service to managed communities since 2008. Landlords can log each resident’s dog into a pet registry. If waste is found in place where it doesn’t belong, a sample of cells extracted from the feces can be compared to an individual in a database of genetic profiles of local dogs.
  • Determining the mix in mixed-breed dogs
    DNA tests are available to reveal what breeds went into creating dogs that are affectionately nicknamed “Heinz 57s.” The AKC designates these dogs as Canine PartnersWisdom Panel, which is owned by Mars Inc., covers all AKC registered breeds, as well as some of the rarer breeds in the Foundation Stock Service listing. The tests cost about $85, and Wisdom Panel says it has sold about 400,000 since the company launched in 2007. Wisdom Panel and other similar tests are available online. Knowing the breed will allow owners to make intelligent choices, based on breed, about healthcare and training. It can also give puppy owners an idea of how large the adult dog is likely to be. Wisdom Panel’s tests are being used by the Search Dog Foundation, which takes dogs from shelters and trains them for search-and-rescue, to help assess if a dog’s genetic background is well-suited to a certain kind of work.
  • Detecting inherited diseases
    Breeders have a responsibility to choose the sires and dams that have the best chance of producing sound, healthy puppies. Genetic testing plays a huge role in this, by giving breeders a heads up that there may be a tendency toward a disease lurking in a dog’s DNA. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Inc., founded in 1966 as a control database for the orthopedic problem known as dysplasia, now maintains voluntary databases of canine health, some of which is based on X-Rays, some on genetic tests. According to an OFA monograph, “knowledge of the genotypic status is the breeder’s most powerful tool for elimination of genetic disease.”
    Today, there are hundreds of these tests, pinpointing the gene for dog diseases. The AKC Canine Health Foundation has a list of available canine genetic tests, organized by breed. There are 119, but more are being researched and added each day. PennGen, a genetic testing facility operated at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine, is a collection of laboratories that coordinate as a not-for-profit unit, that offer routine testing for genetic disease. According to PennGen, more than 900 inherited disorders have been identified in dogs. It maintains a database of available tests, which can be searched by breed or condition. Breed clubs generally list recommended genetic tests.
  • Revealing hidden traits
    DNA tests are also available for detecting genes for coat color and type. A dog may look like he’s a certain color, but may carry the genes for another color, pattern, or texture that may show up in the offspring.

How Can You Get a DNA Test for Your Dog

Several universities and companies offer testing services. Some require blood to be drawn, and this is probably best done by your veterinarian. Others require only a scraping of cells, taken from the inside of the mouth, known as a buccal swab or smear. This video shows how it is done for tests conducted at University of California, Davis. Test kits will provide the materials needed to obtain and ship samples to laboratories.

For more information, visit the AKC DNA Resource Center.Get Your Free AKC eBook

Dr. Marty Goldstein’s Dog Food Presentation

Dr. Marty Goldstein is one of the canine experts I respect the most.  Years ago I had the privilege of attending a workshop where Dr. Goldstein was speaking.  I learned how to prepare my dogs real, appropriate food that they loved! This presentation is about 40 minutes long, but worth the time to watch!  I know Dr. Marty is selling his formula, but, the information on nutrition is so important I had to share.  Below is the link.  Hope this helps you make great choices for your fur kids diet!

My own dogs were on a raw food diet that I prepared myself.  Dr. Marty was one of the experts I learned from to make sure my dog’s meals were nutritionally complete.   Now if you want to feed raw and you live on Long Island, Joe Armellino is a doggy butcher.  Joe makes sure all his formulas have the appropriate amount of ground meat, bone, fat and vegetables.  He sells frozen logs which makes it very easy to give your dog a varied diet.  You can see Joe on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Armellinos-K9-331825363525116/

Enjoy Dr. Marty’s presentation, it is very informative and very important for all doggy parents.

Dr. Goldstein’s Dog Food Presentation

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As always, my goal is to help you keep your dog healthy and happy for as long as possible!!  Please leave a comment or contact me with questions or ideas.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Wishing you Health and Prosperity,

Margaret

Peanut Butter Banana Dog Cookies

My son has 5 Husky’s, they are all so wonderful!  As a grandma, I love to spoil my grandpuppies. So I bake.  I was telling a friend what I make for my puppies, she not only wanted the recipe, she insisted I put it out there.  It’s not my recipe, but it is so easy!! When grandma comes over all 5 pups run over, hoping grandma brought COOKIES!  Here’s the recipe I found online. I sometimes add blueberries and melt carob chips and drizzle over the cooled cookies.  Thank you Damn Delicious!!
Husky Kids

 Peanut Butter Banana Dog Treats – Damn Delicious

https://damndelicious.net/2016/01/25/peanut-butter-banana-dog-treats/print/ 1/1

 

PEANUT BUTTER BANANA DOG TREATS

prep time: 20 MINUTES cook time: 15 MINUTES total time: 35 MINUTES

 

All you need is 4 ingredients for these hypoallergenic treats! And the coconut oil makes these so HEALTHY for your pup!

 

INGREDIENTS: • 3 cups old fashioned oats, or more, as needed • 2 ripe bananas, mashed • 1/4 cup peanut butter • 1/4 cup coconut oil, melted

 

DIRECTIONS: 

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat; set aside.

 

  1. In a large bowl, combine oats, bananas, peanut butter and coconut oil. Add an additional 2 tablespoons oats at a time just until the dough is no longer sticky.

 

  1. Working on a lightly floured surface, knead the dough 3-4 times until it comes together. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Using cookie cutters, cut out desired shapes and place onto the prepared baking sheet.
  2. Place into oven and bake until the edges are golden brown, about 10-12 minutes.*

 

  1. Let cool completely.

 

NOTES: *Baking time will vary depending on the size and thickness of the treats. Serving size will also vary depending on the desired shapes and cookie cutters used.

This delicious recipe brought to you by DAMN DELICIOUS https://damndelicious.net/2016/01/25/peanut-butter-banana-dog-treats/

Does Your Dog Have an Ear Infection?

How do you know if your dog has an ear infection?  Does the ear smell, is it red, is there dirt or black gook?  These are all signs of an ear infection.  Usually floppy eared dogs are prone to ear infections.  Moisture gets trapped inside the ear, bacteria sets in and, voila! an ear infection!

As a Golden Retriever groomer I used to see a lot of gooky, infected ears.  I found this wonderful solution from an amazing woman, Helen McKinnon.  Once I started using it, I never had to deal with dirty ears again!!

Here’s the link to Helen’s sight and a pdf of the Blue Power Ear Treatment.  Hope it helps!!  http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/BLUE.HTM

As always, my goal is to help you keep your dog healthy and happy for as long as possible!!  Please leave a comment or contact me with questions or ideas.  I look forward to hearing from you!

Wishing you Health and Prosperity,

Margaret

Maintaining a Golden Retriever coat between grooms

There are three primary tools necessary to keep your Golden’s coat in shape between grooms. A comb, an undercoat rake and a small slicker brush.

I suggest getting a grooming table.  It is much easier for you and your Golden.  You can get underneath, where a lot of mats start, and, it’s more difficult for your dog to run away!  I also suggest using cookies.  What do Golden’s need and want?  Food and kisses!!  Have some treats broken up and nearby so you can give treats as you comb out.

Your Golden Retriever should be combed out at least 3 times a week, preferably every day, it shouldn’t take more than 5 – 10 minutes. These comb outs are to remove dead undercoat, mostly the hair bunnies all over your house, and to prevent knots and mats.

Your primary tool is your comb. 

I like this comb, it does the job and is comfortable in your hand. This is an Oster, you can get it in Walmart, it comes with a flea comb just in case.

Regular combing will keep the undercoat under control and ensure that any forming knots are found and taken care of. Do not use the slicker brush to maintain the coat, it will break the top coat. The comb addresses the undercoat, which is most of the hair that is shed and where the knots and mats form.

The undercoat rake. 

The undercoat rake should have short teeth and only one row. You don’t have to press hard, you don’t want to scratch your dog. Just a nice easy stroke through the coat until very little undercoat comes out, then switch to the comb.

Sometimes the undercoat becomes dense and the comb won’t go through. This is usually before the coat is blown, or tons of shedding happens. If your comb gets stuck, don’t force it through, use the rake. The rake will go through the dense coat until you can go through with the comb.

The slicker brush.

I like a soft, small slicker brush. This is a doggy man small slicker brush.

This is used when you come across a knot. Start to pull it apart with your fingers and use the brush to brush it out as you pull it apart. If the knot is very large and must be cut out be VERY careful that you don’t cut the dog. If it is very large and close to the skin, or you are uncomfortable, call your groomer, she/he will remove it safely without hurting or cutting your dog.

Regular combing will prevent knots and mats from forming. It will also help with shedding.

I’m planning on making a video to show a proper Golden comb out.  I’ll let you know when it comes out.

I hope this article helps you keep your beautiful Golden Retriever beautiful!

As always, my intention is to help you keep your dog healthy and happy for as long as possible. If you have any questions or need more information, or just want to comment, I love your feed back!

Wishing you health and prosperity!

Margaret

What to look for in a pet sitter

The Villages, FL, is very pet friendly.  A lot of people have dogs, whom they love like children.  These people are retired, so, quite a few of them travel. There is a huge need for qualified, experienced pet professionals.  I am noticing more and more there are also quite a few people who are starting businesses with absolutely no knowledge or experience.  You can make quite a bit of money pet sitting. It disturbs me greatly that these people, who are trying to do right, think that it is alright to work with animals when they have absolutely no experience.  It disturbs me even more that people hire these pet sitters knowing little or nothing about their backgrounds.

 

What to look for in a pet sitter:

 

Experience – how many years have they been working with animals?

What have they done; grooming, training, behavior, vet tech?

What professionals have they worked with?

What classes, seminars, workshops have they attended?

What dog clubs do they or have they belonged to?

Are they physically able to care for your dog in an emergency?

Do they have the knowledge and experience to notice a problem or potential problem? 

Have they volunteered with any organizations?

What work or hobbies did they have with their own dogs?

How often/when do they get the dogs out and for how long?

 

There are also quite a few qualified pet sitters.  Before you have anyone take care of your pet, know about them.  What have they done with animals? What is their work experience with animals?  It’s too easy to call yourself a pet sitter and have no knowledge or experience.  Owning a dog does not qualify you to work in the industry. I know quite a bit more than most people who have had dogs all their lives.  I have been in the industry over 25 years, attended week long training camps with my dogs where we learned obedience training techniques, behavior, nutrition and homeopathics to name a few.  I used to compete with my dogs. I learned how to groom. I attended veterinary workshops. I took a small animal acupressure course. I don’t expect all pet sitters to have my background. I expect them to have a passion for animals and experience working with animals!  I want dogs in my life all the time! The best time usually involves a dog! There are no bad dogs!

 

You could also ask your vet techs, sometimes a young vet tech will do some pet sitting.

 

I hope this helps you choose a qualified, caring pet professional for your fur kids!

As always, my intention is to help you keep your dog healthy and happy for as long as possible. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me!

Wishing you health and prosperity!

Margaret

 

What to look for in a grooming shop.

Those of you who know me know I have very strong opinions about grooming shops.  I have had too many dogs come to me who have been traumatized in shops.  It usually takes me from 1 – 2 years to rehabilitate them to where they enjoy coming to me and tolerate their grooms with little to no stress.

I am so happy to say that I have finally found a shop that I would be comfortable bringing my own dog to.  The shop is called Wild Hair Pet Grooming.  It is owned and run by my good friend Tina.  Not only do I trust Tina to never hurt or hit a dog, her passion and love for dogs is as great as mine, her shop is what I would look for!  She has chairs in the lobby.  The door that goes to the grooming area has an open top so fur parents can see where and how their fur kids are being groomed and by whom!  Her clients are not dropped off in the morning and picked up at night.  They are there only as long as it takes to do the groom, average 2 – 3 hours, which is what it should be.  The entire place is very clean, Tina has toys for her fur clients too!

It’s not a tremendous shop, so there are not loud machines going all day long, which can stress out your pet.  Tina and her staff take the time to get to know the pets who come to them and try to make the comfortable.  

Thank you Tina!!  You are greatly appreciated!

Wild Hair Pet Grooming

As always, my intention is to help you keep your dog healthy and happy for as long as possible. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me!

Wishing you health and prosperity!

Margaret

 

 

 

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